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Bangsa Malaysia Berikan pendapat anda bagi mewujudkan BANGSA MALAYSIA!

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  #31  
Old 04-05-2007, 07:04 PM
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Chinerama Chinerama is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seantang
If got voting system for dead people and people who are born in the year 0X (making them either less than a few years old or 100+), postal voting sure got one.

But by the time your ballot paper reaches the count center back home, I'm not sure the X is still in the box you originally ticked.

So true so true....

Such confidence we have in our beloved garmen...
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  #32  
Old 04-05-2007, 11:26 PM
ong3 ong3 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chinerama
Hi Ong3,

As OT mentioned... it was a letter that was addressed to Mr. Lim which I posted in this thread.

Oops...so sorry, Chinerama. i have misread it. My apology.
Thank you, OT.
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  #33  
Old 05-05-2007, 12:21 AM
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Chinerama Chinerama is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ong3
Oops...so sorry, Chinerama. i have misread it. My apology.
Thank you, OT.

No worries Ong3
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  #34  
Old 05-05-2007, 01:21 AM
UncleSam UncleSam is offline
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Countries that on par with Malaysia 30 years ago are gearing far ahead towards developing country. Even the once miserable nature-resourceless Singapore has its currency valued 2.3X higher. Where have we gone wrong?

The list is almost endless, but most would have mistaken and mislead by most of our great wayang politician to believe that the Bumi's special previlleges discrimination is the biggest cause of failure but it is actually a mere smoke screen to the can of rotten worms.

If one really take a step further to look deeper and think further, it is the corruption & cronies politic that sinking the country and sucking the economy. With the mass of wealth, money & business opportunies, each political position became gold pot that is protected at the expense of racist politic.

NEP is the very machinery that is victimising its beneficiary of poor rural Bumi but it actually fill more cronies pocket pocket fuller than ever. No further elaboration is needed on how the cronies making millions, if not billions for doing nothing but kissing asses.

Champions echoing fight against corruption are debating who is more corrupted and profiteering. The one and only supposely corruption prevent agency head is under corruption scandal. Each ministry and government dept is pointing finger to another on corruption and scandals. Police pay about to rise not on the ground of performance but on the excuse to prevent corruption, unless the increasement is several thousands a month sufficiently justify their corruption income. To the average consumer, things looks the same, kopi money under table still work better.

University ranking dropped to unbelieveable low to the level of 3rd world unknown and unheard foreign university for the very basic reason - garbage in garbage out. Entry requirement to fill the alocated seats is as low as the garbage in the drain where non-bumi top scorers got to pray for their luck, examination standard and passing rate were made to look and feel good to avoid filtering too much garbage out.

Fear of Crime skyrocketing while the police stats could be as contradicting as hell and heaven. More patrol cars than the available car parks in the police stations but it seems to help Proton more than anyone else. If the police is of any use, families will not be in paranoid putting more advance security alarm, unbreakable padlocks, paid monthly neighbourhood security patrolling fees and all imagineable protection effort.

Economy seems booming record high but bursting down at new record each time as well. If that is the good sign that we are made to believe, it surely feel good because feeling is not tangible. Now you see, now you dont.

What more do I see in the future? More corruption, more cronies profiteering, more racist politic, more empty promise, false hope and more commoners (be it bumi or not suffering). How will the coming election make any changes? It won't as it is inherent and built into the system and no man will have the motivation and will power to overturn the 50years old systematic digging machine. The sacrifice, cost and will power to overturn the system will be far too great for anyone that could potentially do it.
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  #35  
Old 05-05-2007, 10:53 AM
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too many so call Firewall in our gomen to protect the interest of so call Malay-sian. IDR is the next big thing and some Malay-sian already barking nonsense that it's not equally distributed. but looking at the committee, our PM really wants the project to be successful. it just the matter of time whether he can withstand those pressure within the group. if he can't, another laughing stock in place for the Kiasuland. actually the success of Bolehland is in the so call Malay-sian. if they dun change their mindset, dun say 30yrs, I think in 5 years time Vietnam goin to chop us down easily. but I always belive in "boon sheng lan goi"........
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  #36  
Old 05-05-2007, 10:08 PM
ong3 ong3 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UncleSam
...The sacrifice, cost and will power to overturn the system will be far too great for anyone that could potentially do it.

UncleSam, i generally agree with your views. On your last remark, i think there are a very small number of devoted activists still in attempt to do so, eventhough the prospect seems gloomy. For the great majority of us who could not join or help them, i feel we should at least get each of our votes counted in every GE.

Last edited by ong3 : 05-05-2007 at 10:12 PM.
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  #37  
Old 05-05-2007, 11:08 PM
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Brain drain and the dearth of human capital

Here's an interesting article from Tony Pua, Lim Kit Siang's spanking new DAP economic advisor. Regardless of his political leanings, he speaks of an issue that I'm intimately familiar with, a phenomenon which I am currently living out.

Although he does not colour his article with racial nuances (I, on the other hand, have no such qualms), he speaks of the unstemmed flow of non-Malay brains (and brawn as well, judging by the thousands of workers trundling across the causeway in blue factory buses and motorcycles each morning) from Malaysia to Singapore.

The sad part is that this happens for no better reason than the fact that the Malay-sian political and social establishment insists that all aspects of Malaysian life be dominated by discriminatory racial quotas and preferences. If these quotas and preferences were based on race-blind need, I'd fall over myself in support of it. But alas they are not. They are based on skin colour and a false social contract used like a FRU truncheon on non-Malay skulls.

From the day that he's born until the day he leaves this world, each Malaysian is constantly reminded that he is either born to enjoy 'special privileges' or born to foot the bill for it. And as if this wasn't enough, fundamentalist Islamisation is increasingly encroaching upon Malaysia's hereto secular multi-religious society. Is it any surprise that the drain is getting deeper and steeper?
Quote:
Human capital the key to growth
Tony Pua
http://www.nst.com.my/Current_News/N...080235/Article

AS an economics enthusiast, I’ve often been asked, "What determines the size of an economy?"

Is it dependent on rubber and high oil palm prices? Or the size of our oil and gas resources? Or instead, is it dependent on land area and population?

Malaysia is extremely well endowed with fertile land, large tracts of tin mines as well as some of the highest quality petroleum reserves in the world. Singapore, our neighbour down south, however, is not as fortunate.

To put it bluntly, it is a tiny island, 480 times smaller than us, completely unsuitable for commercial plantation and lacking any natural resources. Even its population today of some four million, excluding migrant workers, is one-sixth of Malaysia’s population.

If the size of an economy is dependent on the factors highlighted above, such as arable land and natural resources, Malaysia’s economy should be many times the size of Singapore’s. However, reality paints a very different picture.

While Malaysia’s economy of US$130 billion (RM444 billion) is still larger than Singapore’s US$117 billion, the latter is only smaller by some 11 per cent. And if the rate of growth currently experienced in both countries persists for the next decade, then our tiny neighbour could soon boast a larger economy than Malaysia.

How is it even possible for a country with a sheer lack of resources and land mass to do so well? How did a country that was barely half our economic size in the early 1980s catch up within such a short period of time?

Through a simple exercise of elimination, it all boils down to a simple single factor — human capital.

Singapore’s near compulsive obsession with human capital, both in terms of enhancing its local citizenry as well as attracting the best foreign talent, has probably resulted in the highest concentration of top brains per square foot in the region, if not the world.

Every year, for example, Singapore provides financial incentives in the guise of the Asean Scholarship to hundreds of Malaysian students at all levels — post-UPSR, post-PMR, post-SPM and post-STPM — to study in some of the best schools on the island.

I was a fortunate beneficiary of such a scholarship after completing my primary school education in Batu Pahat. Unlike me, however, and unfortunately for Malaysia, most of my peers have chosen to work or even settle permanently in the island nation.

My best friend in primary school, who received the same scholarship after Form Three, went on to pursue his degree at Oxford University on a Neptune Orient Lines (NOL) scholarship. He now works for them, one of the largest shipping companies in the world, as an expatriate country manager in Vietnam.

Another fellow scholar graduated from London School of Economics (LSE) on a scholarship from Singapore Airlines (SIA). Most impressively, at the young age of 36, he has been appointed the chief executive officer of SIA’s subsidiary airline, SilkAir, as of March this year.

And when I had my annual Chinese New Year reunion with my home town classmates this year, I was heartbroken to hear that one of them, who is an academic with one of Singapore’s institutions of higher learning, had just renounced his Malaysian citizenship to become a Singaporean.

These are not my only examples, and you can be assured that I do not have a monopoly on talented friends. A local senior law lecturer recently commented that the Universiti Malaya (UM) law faculty was depleted of quality academics because Malaysians make up some 40 per cent of law lecturers at the National University of Singapore.

While Malaysia Airlines (MAS) struggled over the past decade with cumulative losses in excess of RM1 billion, SIA, which split from MAS in 1972, shone brightly as one of the most profitable airlines in the world. Ironically, it was an outstanding Malaysian and a former academic with UM, Dr Cheong Choong Kong, who led SIA to an unbroken 31-year record of profitability through turbulent economic times before his retirement in 2003.

Hence, when Prime Minister Datuk Seri Abdullah Ahmad Badawi rolled out the Ninth Malaysia Plan (9MP) with an emphasis on human capital, I was pleased to a certain extent. The 9MP had an entire chapter dealing with human capital.

The human capital policy thrusts called for the creation of "universities of international standing and ensuring that tertiary institutions meet the needs of employers" and "nurturing an innovative society with strong science and technology capabilities and the ability to acquire and apply knowledge", among other things.

However, as part of the thrust, there was only a cursory mention of a "National Brain Gain Programme" to be spearheaded by a focal point at the Science, Technology and Innovation Ministry.

There was no discussion on the issue of attracting and retaining local and foreign talents, a critical element in developing Malaysia’s human capital. It is extremely important for the government to recognise the fact that the development of human capital in Malaysia is intrinsically and inexplicably linked to the issue of brain gain and reversing brain drain.

An effective human capital development policy is not just limited to building more schools and universities, or hiring more teachers and lecturers.

Singapore, for example, has only half our ratio of universities to the population. Yet, two out of their three universities are recognised as among the Top 50 in the world.

The government must give thorough consideration to the all-important qualitative element of uncompromising search for the best-qualified educators and an education policy which rewards academic rigour, critical thinking and analytical intelligence.

Without such a policy structure and ingrained culture in place, it is unsurprising that many young and particularly talented Malaysians will seek out the "borderless" global academic environment in which their potential can be fully harnessed.

Concurrently, the country’s education policy must be complemented with an equally competitive economic environment which provides these talents with fair and equal opportunities to grow in their careers, contribute economically and be compensated accordingly — in order to retain these talents.

Our competitors’ ability to attract young Malaysians, provide undisputed world-class quality education and offer a conducive economic environment has clearly resulted in our loss.

It is hard to imagine that my friends, who have done extremely well for themselves overseas, would have had the same opportunities in equivalent entities in Malaysia.

The government must be commended for highlighting the importance of human capital in the economic growth and development of the country. However, if the government is serious about raising the quality of human capital, much more needs to be done to create a holistic and integrated plan that will honestly appraise and critically examine the quality of Malaysia’s educational institutions.

We must also identify the underlying factors, perceived or otherwise, of the lack of equal opportunities and glass ceilings as well as limited career advancement based on merit in many of our "commercial" organisations.

Should our ample pool of potential talent be fully harnessed, attracted and retained, coupled with our rich and God-given natural resources, then surely we can stay well ahead of our competitors, eliminate poverty sooner and become a truly developed nation by 2020.

>>>>> Tony Pua, who has a degree in Philosophy, Politics & Economics from Oxford University, is the economic adviser to DAP’s secretary-general. He blogs at tonypua.blogspot.com
By seantang - 5/05/2007 06:51:00 PM Labels: Nation - Current Events
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  #38  
Old 06-05-2007, 01:04 AM
UncleSam UncleSam is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ong3
For the great majority of us who could not join or help them, i feel we should at least get each of our votes counted in every GE.

Yes that is the least that an average outcasted citizens like us could do, even if it seems more like a drop in the ocean but that is the time we can make our choice. Beside this, don't put too much hope as a bulk of the eligible voting population could be easily bought over, not to mention dozen of other known and unknown tricks to get the vote right. Just pray that the overall result could send a clear signal to the ruling cronies that they can't fool the fools for too long.
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  #39  
Old 18-07-2007, 04:38 PM
MaGicDust MaGicDust is offline
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NEP = Not Economically planned
NEP = Never Ending Policy
NEP = Never Ending Problems

I agree, we have to vote to make a change. After all Ipoh is a non-bumi stronghold. Why would anyone still want to vote for MCA lapdogs? Everyone should start educating their friends and family to make a change in the very near GE!
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  #40  
Old 18-07-2007, 04:57 PM
MaGicDust MaGicDust is offline
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Malaysians are also being systematically marginalised in GEs

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malaysi...election,_2004

Oppostions got 34% of the total votes cast, but only 9.2% representation in the Parlimen! In vote counts, BN should have lost its 2/3 majority in the parlimen. Most of this is due to the unfair division of constituency where heavily populated chinese areas get little MPs, whereas kampung areas get more MPs with a far less population!
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