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  #1  
Old 27-12-2008, 11:00 PM
ipohan ipohan is offline
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Lightbulb Her Father Wants Her Dead because of Apostasy

What is so concern about which religion you are in? If "Reincarnation" is real, you are a Christian in your present life, but you could be a Muslim in your earlier life.

The confirmation of the Existence of Reincarnation by science will settle all this controversies.

Islam's Challenges To 'Universal Human Rights'



Sabatina James uses a pseudonym and lives under police protection after fleeing Austria, where her father threatened to kill her for converting from Islam.

By Jeffrey Donovan, Radio Free Europe Radio Liberty

Sabatina James has one wish. She wants to enjoy the principles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), which is 60 years old this week. But the 26-year-old Austrian of Pakistani heritage, in hiding since becoming Christian, is at the center of a storm between Islam and international human rights law.

After converting from Islam a few years ago, James had to flee from a father who wanted her killed for apostasy -- and from Austrian authorities who instead of protecting her, suggested she resolve the conflict by returning to Islam.

James, who uses a pseudonym, grew up in Linz, a city near the Alps more famous for chocolate than disputes between Islamic and international law. But when she renounced Islam, her father's verdict was clear. "He said, 'In two weeks you have to become a Muslim again or you're dead,'" says James, who fled to Germany, where she now lives under police protection.

On the anniversary of the UDHR's ratification, James's case dramatically illustrates Islam's growing challenge to the principles enshrined in the world's most translated document, including the freedom of thought, conscience, and worship -- and the right to change one's religion.

Many Muslim jurists say Shari'a does not envision such liberties -- and that apostasy is always punishable by death. Although there is growing debate about that interpretation, the tension between Islamic and international law is at the center of James's personal drama as well as Western attempts to accommodate Muslim citizens. It's also behind efforts by Muslim countries to establish new rights frameworks based on Shari'a.*

But what surprises James isn't that Muslim states have sought their own Shari'a-based rights charters. It's that in some Western countries she sees a willingness to have Shari'a applied to Muslim citizens at the expense of their tutelage under national and international laws.

For example, when she was first threatened by her father, James asked local police for help. "They said to me, 'Why don't you become Muslim again? Then you won't have problems, Madam. Why are you doing all that? It doesn't matter if you believe in Allah or Jesus.' But for me, it did matter, and I was living in a country which is not under Islamic law. And I was like, 'Why are these people taking the side of my parents?'"

Mounting Problem

There has been no recorded case of a Muslim being murdered for apostasy in Europe. What's more, such punishment is not regularly practiced in the Muslim world, where it is banned in many countries. Famously, it was outlawed in the Ottoman Empire but remains on the books in countries such as Saudi Arabia and Iran and a real threat to apostates in other countries, such as Pakistan and Afghanistan.

Europe, meanwhile, is increasingly grappling with the legal quandary stemming from Shari'a and a Muslim population that totals some 50 million. Some European courts, religious leaders, and officials have shown a willingness to defer to Muslim rules in the private sphere -- on marriage and divorce or finance, for example.

Last February, the Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams, said it might be "unavoidable" to allow aspects of Shari'a law, such as on marital disputes or finance, to be applied in Britain. Prime Minister Gordon Brown, who said British laws "should be based on British values," shot down his suggestion.

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Old 27-12-2008, 11:08 PM
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Sorry, my mind do not compute. Why do you have to kill someone just because he/she wants to opt of their religion? Anyone?
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Old 29-12-2008, 08:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rockhard
Sorry, my mind do not compute. Why do you have to kill someone just because he/she wants to opt of their religion? Anyone?

that's wat the book (Quran) says supposedly. that apostasy is punishable by death. but i doubt that it's said in the original Quran. More likely the add-on "laws" by Mohd (sorry, forgot the term). where's our in-forum Islam expert(s)?
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Old 29-12-2008, 09:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kanden
that's wat the book (Quran) says supposedly. that apostasy is punishable by death.
Yes, that is what it is but my question is, WHY? Why kill someone just because they don't believe & wants to opt out? Don't people have a choice to decide for themselves what they want to believe in? Anyone?
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Old 13-01-2009, 12:00 PM
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it was not in the holy AlQuran.
it was during the kaliph Umar r.a.time who decreed that apostle must be stoned to death. (if i am wrong here please correct me. my islamic history is rusty)

i do not agree with the killing threat.

sometimes, it is beyond our understanding why something like this happened

do read this , its a good reading:

http://www.islamicperspectives.com/Apostasy1.htm
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Old 13-01-2009, 12:02 PM
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digest this:
THE DEATH PENALTY FOR APOSTASY CONFLICTS WITH THE QUR`AN
The evidence against any legally prescribed penalty for apostasy in Islam does not rest only on the fact that the Qur`an does not prescribe any such penalty while referring to the subject of apostasy many times. We can go further and state that:

a) There is no mandatory death penalty in the Qur`an for any crime.

b) The death penalty for apostasy in fact conflicts with the Qur`an.
The truth of the above statements can be seen by examining the verses: 5:32-33, 45, 2:178 and 4:88-91.

Qur`an 5:32-33, 45, 2:178

In 5:32, after relating the story of the murder of Habil by his brother Qabil, God says:
On that account We ordained for the Children of Israel that if any one slew a person - unless it be for murder or for spreading mischief in the land - it would be as if he slew the whole humanity: and if any one saved a life, it would be as if he saved the whole humanity. Then although there came to them Our Messengers with clear (guidance), yet, even after that, many of them continued to commit excesses in the land. (5:32)
In the context of an emphasis on preserving the life of each and every individual the above verse mentions only two crimes for which a person can be killed:

1) Murdering another human being;
2) Spreading mischief (fasad) in the land.
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Old 15-01-2009, 08:24 PM
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it's just another eg whereby a man w religious power "decreed" and thus a religious law & practice was passed down unquestioned
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Old 15-01-2009, 11:16 PM
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Traditional revolve as civilisation progress, that is how human growing smarter than animal. Otherwise it make us no difference from the cave man or orang utan in jungle. Just like hundreds years back in China, adultery will be punished by suffocating the couples in "chu long" (pig cage). If the same is practise now, our river will be flooded with corpse.
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